Vietnam

Eco Explorations around Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

Vietnam1.png

Vietnam2.pngVietnam3.png
Ho Chi Minh City,Ben Tan Market

Vietnam4.pngVietnam5.png
HCM City Red Cathedral,Black Virgin Mountain

Black Virgin Mountain
Black Virgin Mountain (Vietnamese: Núi Bà Ðen meaning "Black Lady Mountain", Khmer: Phnom Chol Baden) is a mountain in the Tay Ninh Province of Vietnam. To the Vietnamese the mountain is the center of a myth about Bà Ðen, a local deity of Khmer origin. During the Vietnam War the area around the mountain was very active as the Ho Chi Minh Trail ended a few kilometers west across the Cambodian border. As such there were many battles and American and Vietnamese soldiers based in the region remember the prominent landmark.[1] After the war the mountain turned from a battle ground to being famous for the its beautiful temples and theme park.

Vietnam6.pngVietnam7.png

Dalat is located on a verdant plateau containing pine forests and lakes, located 300 km northeast of Ho Chi Minh City. At the elevation 1,500 meters, Dalat's cool climate provides a pleasant respite from the heat and humidity of the lowlands and it was for this reason that the French developed it in the early 1900's as a summer retreat.

Vietnam8.png

Dalat's colonial influences can still be seen in its cathedral and some of the 2,000 villas that dot the town. The town has a relaxed atmosphere and is very popular with Vietnamese holiday makers, primarily honeymooners. In recent years, enormous amounts of money have been spent to restore the city to its former glory. Lakes have been dredged and cleaned, old buildings have been restored, and new hotels have been built. Foreign investors renovated an old French chateau, the Sofitel Palace Hotel, now managed by the Accor Group.

Vietnam10.png

Lang Biang Mountains is located on Lang Biang Plateau, Lac Duong District, Lam Dong Province. It’s only about 12km from Dalat centre and sometimes called Lam Vien Mountain as well.

Vietnam11.pngVietnam12.png

Tuyen Lam Lake, 6 km to the South of Dalat, has the water surface of 350 ha. It was created by Tia stream - head water of Da Tam River. No one knows when and why it was called Tuyen Lam, but maybe because of the grandiose nature around it - stream and forest were close to each other. Tuyen stands for stream, Lam stands for forest. Tuyen Lam is a place for water and tree meeting each other.

The lake and its campus have fresh air, tranquil atmosphere and diversified natural landscape. The lake will become a big tourist attraction with the unique types of tourism such as sight-seeing, camping, health caring, trekking, mountain climbing, fishing, visiting revolutionary base and other activities for sport and recreation, especially eco-tourism.

If viewed from the cable car or seen from above, Tuyen Lam Lake is as a miniature ocean with each oasis on the lake is a continent, when choosing type of yacht to explore the lake, you will feel the immensity between sky and water surface, feeling completely immersed in nature, relax completely. And from that perspective, you will discover a very different Dalat. Slope, hills look like higher, space is vast and spreads over.

Vietnam13.pngVietnam14.png
Cable car to Tuyen Lam,Cruising Boats by the Tuyen Lam Lake

Vietnam15.pngVietnam16.png
Tuyen Lam Lake, Restaurant

Mui Ne

Northast of Phan Thiet the coastal road climbs over the slope of a Cham-Tower-topped hill and descends onto the long, sandy crescent of Mui Ne Bay. The formerly little-inhabited beach south of the fishing village of Mui Ne proper has seen some serious development in the last 15 years. Now it is a 15 km long strip of resorts that line up like pearls on Nguyen Dinh Chieu street, shaded by coconut palms. The main resort strip lies between the addresses of 2 and 98 Nguyen Dinh Chieu and is actually named Ham Tien.

Given the choice, nature would move the sand around, much to the dismay of some developers. Beach sand tends to migrate up and down the coast seasonally, leaving some (but not all) spots with just a concrete breakwater rather than sandy beach. There is always a good sandy beach somewhere along this 10 km beach. Accommodations at higher addresses tend to be smaller and less expensive, somewhat removed from the main tourist section and more mixed in with local life. If a sandy beach is important to you, some research is called for before booking in that area.

A few bargain hotels have popped up on the inland side of the road, across from the beach-side resorts. If you stay on the inland side, you will need to pass though one of the resorts to reach the beach, which might or might not result in some hassle from the guards. The resorts jealously guard their lounge chairs and palapas, though the beach itself is open to everyone. If all else fails, you can always access a nice sandy stretch of beach via the Wax Bar at 68 Nguyen Dinh Chieu.

Vietnam17.pngVietnam18.png

Sands Dunes of Mui Ne

The White Dunes are by far the larger dunes and are known by locals as Bau Trang or White Lake. There are quite a few small stands selling food and drinks to visitors within the area along with pine trees offering much-needed shade.

The Red Dunes, as the name suggests, features reddish-brown sand that makes them a more popular place for photography. Smaller than White Dunes, they are easier to reach. Sand-sledding is a common (and fun) activity here, but it is hard to nail down where the best location to do so is as the sands shift from season to season so it’s best to look around. Dry sand is much more enjoyable to sled on.

Vietnam19.pngVietnam20.png

Vietnam21.pngVietnam22.png

The Eastern Coast of Vietnam south of Muine
When comes to the peak season, Muine is usually packed with both local and Overseas tourists. To get away from the crowd, there are several Coastal Resorts along the eastern coast south of Muine. One of which is the Coastal Resort

Cu Chi

The tunnels of Cu Chi are an immense network of connecting underground tunnels located in the Cu Chi district of Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam, and are part of a much larger network of tunnels that underlie much of the country. The Cu Chi tunnels were the location of several military campaigns during the Vietnam War, and were the Viet Cong's base of operations for the Tet Offensive in 1968.

The tunnels were used by Viet Cong soldiers as hiding spots during combat, as well as serving as communication and supply routes, hospitals, food and weapon caches and living quarters for numerous North Vietnamese fighters. The tunnel systems were of great importance to the Viet Cong in their resistance to American forces, and helped to counter the growing American military effort.

Vietnam23.png

Back to Vietnam